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In this May 8, 2019, file photo, a Yolo! brand CBD oil vape cartridge sits alongside a vape pen on a biohazard bag on a table at a park in Ninety Six, S.C. More than 50 people around Salt Lake City had been poisoned by the time the outbreak ended early last year, most by a vape called Yolo!, the acronym for "you only live once." (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

Products that contain CBD and/or THC are not allowed on school property, and Newton-Conover City Schools wants to be sure students and parents are aware.

The Newton-Conover City Schools Board of Education had its first reading of new and edited board policies recently.

According to the draft of the policy on drugs and alcohol, CBD is a legal substance, but some product ingredients are questionable, including the source from which the substance is derived.

The policy draft states that all CBD and THC substances are prohibited — no exceptions.

CBD is an abbreviation for cannabidiol and is found in marijuana and hemp. It is touted as alleviating anxiety and pain. THC can also be found in a marijuana plant, and it is the chemical that induces euphoric and other feelings.

Here’s what the website Leafly says about CBD and THC:

”We typically associate cannabis with getting stoned, but CBD can be extracted from the plant to make products that come without the high or the smoke. The molecule in cannabis that gets us high is called THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), and nowadays, you can turn to cannabis-derived CBD products with little to no THC for clear-headed symptom relief.”

“Presently we do not allow smoking or vaping on campus, nor do we allow students to self-administer medicine, even (over-the-counter),” Superintendent Aron Gabriel noted.

This is part of Newton-Conover City Schools’ commitment to create a drug-free environment, he added.

Disciplinary actions if a student were found with CBD or THC products on campus are the same as they would be if they were caught with tobacco or vaping products, according to Sylvia White, executive director of auxiliary services for Newton-Conover City Schools.

Possession of tobacco or vaping products is a Level 3 offense, according to the Newton-Conover City Schools website. It could result in a student being suspended.

The policy additions will be read again at the board meeting tonight. The policy will likely be voted on during that meeting, Gabriel said.

CBD is also not allowed at Hickory Public Schools, according to Beverly Snowden, director of communications for the school district.

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